Steinbeck’s intentions were to show how being a ‘nigger’ is a human being portrayed as simply nothing, having no traits, or feelings. In chapter 4, page 69, he questions Lennie, “You travel around’ with George don’t ya?”. In chapter 4, Crooks and Lennie have a conversation about Crooks being a black. In Slim Steinbeck creates a character ... own ways up from the bottom. Like most of the characters in the story, he admits that he is extremely lonely. I'm no dog or rooster.' Furthermore, this suggests that after Crooks lets his barrier down to Candy and Lennie, and starting to have hope, Crooks could gain companionship by achieving the American dream. Crooks is lonely. Crooks comments that he can't live in the bunkhouse, and cant even play cards in there. Of Mice & Men - Quotes that show Lennie's loneliness/dreams? Here are some quotes that might help: 5) Crooks, on a black man's loneliness: "S'pose you didn't have nobody. S'pose you couldn't go into the bunk house and play rummy 'cause you was black. George took an innocent life without reason. Page 70 shows Crooks tell Lennie “The white kids come to play at our place (…) some of them was pretty nice.” This suggests his nostalgic feelings, making him vulnerable at this stage. The following goals are covered in the lesson: The following goals are covered in the lesson: Crooks doesn’t have a companion, because he is the only African American man on the ranch, and in that time, everything was segregated. I knowed his Aunt Clara. I tell ya, I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick.” Here Crooks expresses his loneliness and how he … As a black man with a physical handicap, Crooks is forced to live on the periphery of ranch life. Books ain’t no good. "I cant' play because I'm black. —Douglas Coupland. He interrupts “brutally” saying “you guys is just kidding yourself” and makes the harsh comment that … I need to know four characters from the novel that are lonely and then I need some quotes to show they are lonely. Crooks is a minority character introduced in chapter 4. The 1930s was a highly racist period in American history, and the other ranch hands shun him because he is black. Books ain't no good. As a result of this, he utters many memorable quotes. He is isolated from the other ranchers because of his race. BIBLIOGRAPHY John Stauffer. Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you. I tell ya, I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an' he gets sick" (80). Page 77 shows Crooks in defence to Curley’s Wife “We don’t want no trouble.” The use of the word ’we’ shows Crooks having confidence to defend himself alongside Candy and Lennie. This is not an example of the work written by professional academic writers. Section 4, on the night that Lennie visits Crooks in his room. While Saitama keeps battling new monsters every day, he maintains his carefree attitude. #2: ″‘Come on in and set a while,’ Crooks said. In my opinion, because of Crock is black, it does not mean that everyone does not like him. Crooks comments that he can't live in the bunkhouse, and cant even play cards in there. He lives by himself because he is the only black man on the ranch. Portrayed by Curley, Curley’s Wife is the loneliest character on the ranch that even Steinbeck doesn’t give her a name. They say I stink. Not only does this show how Crooks is quite lonely, but he is also treated unfairly because of racial discrimination. This shows that, in contrast to the boss and Curley, he understands why George and Lennie are together. Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself. However Crocks is always alone, he has no friends, and he wants to have a friends like George and Lennie. Linking back to the previous point, segregation of the white men and the black men consequences Crooks to remain in the harness room where he works. Lennie being mentally much less able gives the ideal opportunity to help exercise some authority in Crooks‘ life. ... to talk and he is black. Steinbeck is presenting the bad streak that loneliness is drawing from Crooks, as a minority character. Crooks speaks these words to Lennie in Section 4, on the night that Lennie visits Crooks in his room. Remember: the time you feel lonely is the time you most need to be by yourself. Earlier in the conversation with Lennie he uses a tone that is harsh and dismissive on Pg. Crock must have a bad experience with it, and he cannot forget it. A white person of the 1930’s would of saw Crooks as a black worker and nothing. This shows that having companionship makes Crooks’ character more confident. He’s so lonely that he considers reading books to accompany him. He isn’t allowed to join any social activities at the ranch and is completely left out alone. Source(s): mice men loneliness quotes: https://shortly.im/AcPu2 This passage highlights the need for companionship and the oppressive nature of Crooks… She took him when he was a baby and raised him up. Crooks tells Lennie that “a guy needs somebody – to be near him”. Crooks is bookish and likes to keep his room neat, but he has been so beaten down by loneliness and prejudicial treatment of that he is now suspicious of any kindness he receives. On page 108, Glen asks Bone, "' ... want to fight for white men. Free Samples and Examples of Essays, Homeworks and any Papers, Filed Under: Essays Tagged With: great depression, race. A guy needs somebody-to be near him. CROOKS TELLING LENNIE how lonely he is an how lucky Lennie is to have a companion to travel with. Crooks is a lively, sharp-witted, black stable-hand, who takes his name from his crooked back. They're not out … Don't make no difference who the guy is, long's he's with you. “Him and me was both born in Auburn. Nearer the beginning of the chapter, amongst Lennie’s entrance, on page 68 Crooks states “Don‘t come in a place where you‘re not wanted.” Crooks is shown being harsh to Lennie, and trying to push him away. Page 13 / Chapter 1 As Ultima walked past me I smelled for the first time a trace of the sweet fragrance of herbs that always lingered in her wake. Honesty means doing things that are morally right. Crooks said to Lennie: Well, I ... was to be a black man. Crooks (named for his crooked back) is the stable hand who works with the ranch horses. Steinbeck presents Crooks with cynical views at this point of the chapter, which supports Crooks‘ understanding that loneliness drives you to insanity. Had an alfalfa patch.” This shows us Crooks’ childhood of him already experiencing the land, which suggests Crooks’ understanding of the freedom of the American dream lifestyle the ranch workers want. #2: “Lennie—if you jus’ happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here an’ hide in the brush… Hide in the brush till I come for you.” #3: “It ain’t so funny, him an’ me goin’ aroun’ together,” George said at last. A guy needs somebody-to be near him. Crooks is a lively, sharp-witted, black stable-hand, who takes his name from his crooked back. Crocks has hated by everyone since he was born because he is black, and he also has hated himself. Here are some quotes that might help: 5) Crooks, on a black man's loneliness: "S'pose you didn't have nobody. "The only people who distrust the cops are crooks. ... for sociological change. No one on the ranch is interested in anything that Crooks has to say and he is fully aware of this. page 71 one quotes a “private victory” and even pleasance in some manner. He tells Lennie “I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick”. Many years later, long after Ultima was gone and I had grown to be a man, I would awaken sometimes at night and think I caught a scent of her fragrance in the cool-night breeze. Furthermore, because Crooks knows his rights and standing, he understands that he is a minority among the ranch workers as he is the only black worker. The terminative comments are cruel and are linked to his jealousy of the companionship of George and Lennie, page 71 one quotes a “private victory” and even pleasure in some way. In conclusion, Steinbeck’s character of Crooks is used to convey the effects of racial oppression and loneliness for black people during 1930’s America. This suggests that Crooks’ loneliness has caused him to no longer accept any kindness, whether its from a white or black man. Crooks is presented to us an intelligent man despite his race. ... As the story unfolds Crooks becomes very pessimistic in his outlook towards the American dreams of Ranch Workers. Crooks is faced with racial prejudice from Curley’s wife in chapter 4. When Lennie comes to pet the puppies, he doesn’t realize that Crooks’ room is off limits, Crooks instantly becomes defensive stating “I ain’t wanted in the bunk room and you ain’t wanted in my room” (68). Explore Crooks Quotes by authors including Charles Barkley, Tom Hanks, and John Gunther at BrainyQuote. Steinbeck most clearly illustrates this theme through Crooks, Candy, and Curley’s wife. Disclaimer: This work has been submitted by a student. Crooks needs a dream to give him hope during the great depression of the 1930’s. Earlier in the conversation with Lennie he uses a tone that is harsh and dismissive on Pg. Crooks’ room suggests the means of his life. Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you. Crooks tells Lennie that “a guy needs somebody – to be near him”. Any defence he may put forward would not even be heard, because of the racial prejudice he faces. “S’pose George don’t come back no more. The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race. ‘Long as you won’t get out and leave me alone, you might as well set down.‘” #3: “George can tell you screwy things, and it … This is suggested by Crooks, already being aware of the discrimination he faces by being excluded from the bunk house with the white workers, he is ’not wanted’ by them which is exactly what he says to Lennie. Crooks, alike Curley’s wife, is also lonely as he is the only coloured man in the ranch. page 71 one quotes a “private victory” and even pleasance in some manner. I knowed his Aunt Clara. I tell ya, I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick (80). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: ). Life’s cruelest irony. Crooks (named for his crooked back) is the stable hand who works with the ranch horses. “Well, jus’ … He is lonely because he has been shunned and outcast ed by everyone due to them being racist. They say I stink’. Like al the characters he has the potential to grow and flourish however he is restricted due to prejudice in the society, which he lives in. This is a contrasting point in the chapter, as we understand Crooks’ want for social acceptance, because during his childhood he wasn’t exposed to the racial discrimination he faces at his present day. The description of his room, on page 66 reads “which hung broken harness in process of being mended.” This suggests that Crooks has no separation from his working life to his personal life. By this stage of the chapter, there has been a power shift. A guy goes nuts if he ain’t got nobody. For more on this character, read the lesson called, Crooks in Of Mice and Men: Dream, Loneliness & Quotes. Chapter 1, page 4, #2: "Devon is sometimes considered the most beautiful school in New England, and even on this dismal afternoon its power was asserted." In fact, Crooks protects himself by acting like a ‘proud and aloof man. —Douglas Coupland. In fact, Crooks protects himself by acting like a "proud and aloof man. 82 saying “I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick”. "A guy gets too lonely an' he gets sick"-Motivation for his cruelty, deeply miserable.Desperate for company.Sick in body and mind. Crooks isn’t shown as a main character of the story, but is given much light in this chapter. This shows Crooks’ character dwelling on how alone he is without anyone to talk to or interact with. crooks, stable-hand, is another lonely character at the ranch. 414 Shares Our latest collection of honesty quotes that will help appreciate the value of being truthful. Crooks openly admitted to how he gets sick of being so lonely, and just as soon as he finally managed to open up and expose himself to the outside world, he emotionally withdrew back within himself just as quickly, for having permanent company and a real chance of surfacing from his abyss of loneliness was too good to be true. Crooks speaks these words to Lennie in Section 4, on the night that Lennie visits Crooks in his room. He isn’t allowed to join any social activities at the ranch and is completely left out alone. "Crooks' body was bent over to the left by his crooked spine, and his eyes lay deep in his head, and because of their depth they seemed to glitter with intensity. She took him when he was a baby and raised him up. 11 of 17 Key event 4- Third quote.. The terminative comments are cruel and are linked to his jealousy of the companionship of George and Lennie, page 71 one quotes a “private victory” and even pleasure in some way. This is symbolic and he declares having a light is a basic human right he is entitled to. – ôVDoՋ4ŠÚRnÑUÓÂê¤ñÔX w®¿ÎkÚ­z5ΉjfV®«ãÔ[tDkäRoÕišœWò®òD.¹ÊŔà “I … The loneliest character is Crooks. Page 71 for instance, “S’pose George don’t come back no more. Don’t make no difference who the guy is, long’s he’s with you. "I was born right here...the white kids come to play at our place, an' sometimes I went to play with them, and some of them was pretty nice. Crooks’ comment that “a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick” shows that emotional pain can be as profound as physical. The following goals are covered in the lesson: The following goals are covered in the lesson: Here you can order a professional work. He does this by letting us experience the racism and discrimination Crooks receives for being black, not so much disabled, after we get to know and understand the intelligence and extent of his character. This quote proves how Crooks is very lonely, because the men play cards but don’t let him play because they say he stinks and he is black. Lennie was not like a sick animal that was suffering and ... ... much compassion for his characters.Take Lenny in, "Of Mice and Men", Steinbeck had a lot of compassion for him, but because of ... was obvious that he had plenty of sympathy for these characters. Black Boy In the penultimate chapter of Black Boy, Richard ... of Carolina, by many characters. "(68) This quote illustrates that Crooks feels the pain of rejection more that he let's people see. Honesty is one of the most important attributes in life. It was not glossy and new. Crooks’ comment that “a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick” shows that emotional pain can be as profound as physical. Using his situation on the ranch to give us a glimpse of society and the realism. The negative psychological impacts that racial discrimination has on Crooks begin to very obviously surface; starting to give the reader a possible explanation to the cold-hearted way in which he treated Lennie. ‘Just like heaven. Then George and Lennie could have bought their little house and lived ... wanted to live. How'd you like that? I really need some loneliness quotes in of mice and men my exam is is two days. He is isolated from the other ranchers because of his race. So that’s why Crocks said to Lennie that George is not coming back. I tell ya, I tell ya a guy gets too lonely an’ he gets sick (80). Nearer the beginning of the chapter, amongst Lennie’s entrance, on page 68 Crooks states “Don‘t come in a place where you‘re not wanted.” Crooks is shown being harsh to Lennie, and trying to push him away. Like most of the characters in the story, he admits that he is extremely lonely. Crooks’ loneliness can be identified by the scene in the novella when Lennie enters Crooks room. This shows that, in contrast to the boss and Curley, he understands why George and Lennie are together. Crooks character has a need for companionship due to his loneliness. Steinbeck presents Crooks on a personal level in chapter 4. The terminative remarks are barbarous and are linked to his green-eyed monster of the company of George and Lennie. Here Crooks expresses his loneliness and how he is an outcast to the rest of the workers on the ranch. Page 66 reads “negro stable buck.” Crooks’ character is introduced exactly the way he would be seen by other ranch workers. A guy goes nuts if he ain't got nobody. Crooks does this because he is afraid of being hurt by anyone, holding a barrier up towards the other workers who already discriminate him. Page 74 of chapter 4 sees Candy‘s entrance to Crooks‘ room, “You can come in if you want.” Crooks’ reply to Candy is less defensive than previously, as Lennie’s child-like kindness has created a domino effect. However, because of the segregation between the black and white workers, Crooks seems to be talking to himself rather than to Lennie. He is lonely because he has been shunned and outcast ed by everyone due to them being racist. #2: “Lennie—if you jus’ happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here an’ hide in the brush… Hide in the brush till I come for you.” #3: “It ain’t so funny, him an’ me goin’ aroun’ together,” George said at last. He’s so lonely that he considers reading books to accompany him. His isolation has turned him bitter and twisted, and he has adopted a defensive hostility to the world. crooks, stable-hand, is another lonely character at the ranch. Not only does this show how Crooks is quite lonely, but he is also treated unfairly because of racial discrimination. Quotes tagged as "crooks" Showing 1-11 of 11 “It is a pleasant world we live in, sir, a very pleasant world. As Crooks is opening up, Candy appears at the door. His resentment typically ... the opening pages of the novel. Crooks Quotes in Of Mice and Men. In addition, nobody considers Crooks’ disablement, when leaving him to live in these inhumane conditions because he was a black man who they saw had no standing. This passage is Important to the novel because It proves in the very ... Companionship creates confidence in Crooks’ character. It gives you peace of mind where […] Crooks has been lonely and friendless for so long that he almost can't deal with someone trying to be nice to him. Steinbeck is presenting the bad streak that loneliness is drawing from Crooks, as a minority character. Willingly disclosing such a personal memory helps with our understanding of this character, he is wise and able to distinguish the fact that not all white people are racist. This quote illustrates that Crooks feels the pain of rejection more that he lets people see. The terminative comments are cruel and are linked to his jealousy of the companionship of George and Lennie, page 71 one quotes a “private victory” and even pleasure in some way. They say I stink. Crooks is lonely because he is the only black man on the ranch. Crooks is at ease as his barrier is broken down, and his excitement is buried whilst he still craves the conversation. Steinbeck’s intentions of presenting Crooks for the first time to us in this way, is to give us the outline of the black workers of 1930’s America. "Crooks' body was bent over to the left by his crooked spine, and his eyes lay deep in his head, and because of their depth they seemed to glitter with intensity. Crooks is to the full cognizant of the hurt this would do Lennie. Steinbeck most clearly illustrates this theme through Crooks, Candy, and Curley’s wife. Candy and Lennie discuss the “dream farm”. Crooks comments that he can't live in the bunkhouse, and cant even play cards in there. There are bad people in it, Mr. Richard, but if there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.” ― Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop. This also supports the theme of ISOLATION and the lack of civil rights. The negative psychological impacts that racial discrimination has on Crooks begin to very obviously surface; starting to give the reader a possible explanation to the cold-hearted way in which he treated Lennie. He longs for company Crooks said sharply, "You got no right to come in my room...Nobody got any right in here but me." exam coming up, and I think I've got quotes on all the important themes for every character, except Lennie. Steinbeck is presenting the bad streak that loneliness is drawing from Crooks, as a minority character. Crooks is lonely because he is a black man on a ranch that is otherwise white. Crooks said sharply, "You got no right to come in my room...Nobody got any right in here but me." When Lennie comes to pet the puppies, he doesn’t realize that Crooks’ room is off limits, Crooks instantly becomes defensive stating “I ain’t wanted in the bunk room and you ain’t wanted in … S'pose you couldn't go into the bunk house and play rummy 'cause you was black. The importance of Crooks’ room is to demonstrate the segregation of America in the 1930’s. Crooks becomes lonely because of the racial discrimination all the workers give him. He states on page 68, “I got a right to have a light.” He is very quick in his response to Lennie. Since this book is set during the Depression, Jim Crow laws are still in effect, whites and blacks had separate facilities for socializing and living. "I cant' play because I'm black. As Crooks is a black man he isn’t allowed to sleep in the bunk house with the white workers. ... outsider, even in his home state. Crooks is a lonely character amongst the ranch workers. Crooks clearly confesses this on Pg. One-Punch Man: 10 Most Memorable Saitama Quotes. He lives by himself because he is the only black man on the ranch. Crooks is a black man set on a 1930’s ranch, working as a stable buck. Crooks is bookish and likes to keep his room neat, but he has been so beaten down by loneliness and prejudicial treatment of that he is now suspicious of any kindness he receives. The old stable-hand admits to the very loneliness that George describes in the opening pages of the novella. As a black man with a physical handicap, Crooks is forced to live on the periphery of ranch life. How'd you like that? Thus, we can see that he lives a very lonely life. Life’s cruelest irony. Ranch hands are ideal types of people to portray as being lonely, because their constant travel leaves them without someone to talk to or share things with. Source(s) Of Mice and Men – Crocks (Page.71)”. The terminative remarks are barbarous and are linked to his green-eyed monster of the company of George and Lennie. Cognizant of the 1930 ’ s he ’ s he ’ s.... Proves in the ranch is otherwise white character at the door guy needs somebody – to be much more,. 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